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Monday, April 15, 2013

Tony's Secret Ingredient Spaghetti and Meatballs!




Back in the early 1920's Tony Andolini had one of the premier italian dining locations in New York City. His restaurant, Tony's, was subsequently shut down when a reporter/ food critique by the name of Rodney "Scoops" Peabody discovered the secret ingredient in his world famous spaghetti and meat balls! Scoops' discovery made national headlines! Ruined and humiliated Andolini never opened another restaurant. He denied the allegations of using "questionable products" to his deathbed in 1943. However, recently discovered was this old family photo of Tony out back in the alleyway cooking up an "old family recipe".

This was a really fun Illustration for me. I'd been sitting on this ruff sketch of a chef for a few months and really wanted to paint it. While trying to figure out a creative direction to take the image I the thought came to me "What is the secret ingredient in a secret ingredient recipe?" and this is what came from that idea.

I painted a full color version of this but it wasn't working for me so I decided to give it a sepia tone and a little ware and tear. This painting is 100% digital and was created in Photoshop CS6. I included a little gif so you can see the steps it took to create this image.

6 comments:

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  2. What a fun picture! I love the values and eye movement... you only find out what the secret ingredient is after searching for it. I love the back story and the chef has the perfectly proud expression. The sepia is rich and fantastic without "color". I love the cup residue on the 'photo'. Nice work Adam.

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  3. Thanks for the kind words Matt, I'm glad you liked the painting!

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  4. Great idea using the animated gif. I also really like the glass stain.

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  5. Thanks Todd! Thought the gif. would be a nice way to quickly show the process steps.

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  6. Really like the emotion and mystique you have built into this piece. Well done.

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